Mind Blog

Mind Blank

We are a unique community led response
to a national mental health priority.
Donate

Dealing with a Changing World COVID 19

Tips for Easing Out of Lockdown

Earlier this year, when the Coronavirus pandemic peaked and entire nations were forced indoors to quarantine, the main consideration was how to survive lockdown. But with restrictions now easing all over the world, the new challenge is how to reintegrate back into “real life.” Some of us have school aged children and are negotiating their re-entry to class; others are employees wondering how to stay safe when returning to the office; and some of us can’t quite remember what life pre-lockdown even looked like! If you’re surprised by how difficult coming out of lockdown seems, read on for some practical ways to take those first baby steps.

Be patient with yourself

As people start to talk more about their post-lockdown plans, it’s difficult to know how to feel. If you’re anxious about getting on with old routines, be patient with yourself and realise that it’s OK to feel uncertain. While some people will naturally feel excited about regaining old freedoms and connecting with loved ones, others may feel nervous, frightened about health risks and worried about new challenges the lockdown has brought. The most important thing is to understand that the pandemic has been enormously stressful, and it’s OK to take time to find your feet or adjust. Have patience and self-compassion during the transition.

Re-establish any connections that have suffered during lockdown

Humans are social creatures and derive enormous stress relief, joy, and a sense of purpose in connecting with others, but it’s understandable that stressful times have made it a challenge to keep in touch. Now may be the best time to reach out and gently re-establish important relationships.

Leaders in home elderly care Helping Hands have seen the difficult effects of lockdown firsthand, and they know that people are feeling ambivalent about visiting older relatives. “The incubation period for Covid-19 can be up to 14 days, so an infected person may not show any symptoms for up to two weeks,” they say. “Naturally, many people feel extremely upset about being unable to visit their older relatives for an unknown amount of time. However, it’s important to remember that this rule is in place to protect the health of the elderly.”

Though it’s still necessary to avoid contact with elderly or vulnerable family members, now might be a good time to check in and re-commit to clever ways of staying in touch. While you’re at it, you might consider reaching out to old friends and family who you may have neglected a little during lockdown. Stat small with a phone call or Skype chat if you’re not confident meeting in person yet.

Seek support if you need it

In trying to cope with work disruptions, a potentially chaotic home situation and delays and interruptions in almost every area of life, it’s understandable that many people have put their mental health on the back burner. Now, with a faint light at the end of the tunnel, the prospect of less stress can ironically have us feeling overwhelmed by issues we haven’t had the opportunity to properly address.

Take the time to figure out what TLC you need to get back on your feet after lockdown, particularly if childcare, work or relationship strains have been taking their toll. Commit to doing things you know you enjoy, take enough time to rest, or seeking the help of an online counsellor or therapist.

Establish routines again

Suddenly, so many “normal” activities seem quite frightening, like attending group events, going on public transport or shopping. Psychologists call this stress “re-entry syndrome”, and the best way to combat it is to gently keep encouraging yourself to get back into normal routines.

Trauma can leave us feeling apprehensive, and weeks in isolation may mean we have a lower threshold for socialising. Take small steps and understand that you’ll need stress management techniques to put anxiety in perspective. Stay positive by focusing on the good things, practicing meditation, or do a quick visualisation before you have to leave the house. It will get better with time!

Keep healthy

Finally, one of the best ways to ease the transition out of lockdown is to channel anxieties into something practical. There’s a lot we can all do to keep in tip-top shape – low stress means a stronger immune system, and exercise is still one of the best ways to alleviate low mood. Commit to eating well, sleeping enough, and taking care of yourself in these strange and challenging times. You’ll be able to better face an uncertain and stressful future if you feel resilient and relaxed.

About the Author

Chloe Walker is a 20 something freelance writer, currently writing about topics relating to mental health and wellbeing. She first started writing about this subject after seeing the effects of social media on the younger generation and hopes that by writing about this topic it will help to diffuse the stigma based around it.

You can get in touch with Chloe via email on chloe.walker@harbourmail.co.uk

February 20, 2021
Anxiety in Children

Anxiety in Children. What are the causes? Click here to find out more through our online blog page.

Read more
February 20, 2021
Bullying In Schools

Find out about how bullying in schools can effecting children’s mental health. Be proactive about prevention today.

Read more
February 20, 2021
Depression Awareness

Depression in young adults is not something to take lightly. We believe that no one needs to suffer alone.

Read more
February 20, 2021
Body Image & Self Perception

Body Image issues in Young Adults is a subject we all need to talk about.

Read more
February 20, 2021
Understanding Anxiety

Anxiety what are the facts and how to deal with it?

Read more
February 20, 2021
Suicide Prevention: Creating a Future for our Young People

Suicide Prevention can help create a better future for our young people. Read more out more about suicide prevetion via our online blog series.

Read more
February 20, 2021
Award Winning Programs

In 2017 Mind Blanks efforts were recognised in winning the Mental Health Matters Award for Mental Health Promotion, and in 2019 the team was presented with the Mental Health Services Award for Mental Illness Prevention.

Read more
February 20, 2021
Why Are Early Intervention Programs Important?

Mind Blank early intervention programs are known from winning award recognition in the mental health sector. Our award-winning programs have toured Australia wide. Enquire within.

Read more
February 20, 2021
Program Evaluation and Suicide Prevention

Mind Blank program evaluations encourage seek to understand our effectiveness against our intended goals. Want more info? Get in touch today.

Read more
February 20, 2021
Crisis Numbers

You may be looking for some additional help-seeking service support. Please note that Mind Blank itself does not provide crisis intervention or counselling, there are some help-seeking phone numbers and helplines provided on this page. If you are in need of urgent support or are worried about someone, please contact your local doctor or call emergency services on 000.

Read more
February 20, 2021
Mental Health Support - How To Help?

Want to know what can you do to help support someone who is struggling? Here are our top 6 tips.

Read more
February 20, 2021
Australian & New Zealand Mental Health Association Collaboration

Mind Blank is proud to announce that we have made an alliance with the Australian & New Zealand Mental Health Association.

Read more
February 20, 2021
Activities To Give Your Mental Health A Boost

This article will feature's ways that you can boost your mental well-being.

Read more
February 20, 2021
Nature and Nurture

Nature and spending time outdoors are great for your mental health. Read on to find out why?

Read more
February 20, 2021
‍Child Adolescent Mental Health Conference 2021

The Child & Adolescent Mental Health Conference is designed to provide practical, relevant information and strategies for professionals to apply directly to their work supporting the mental health of children and adolescents from 3-19 years of age.

Read more
February 20, 2021
Whistleblower Policy

Click here to find out more about the Mind Blank Ltd Whistle Blower policy.

Read more
February 20, 2021
Fundraising Privacy Collection Statement

Are you thinking of making a donation to Mind Blank? Click here to find out more about Mind Blank Ltd's fundraising and collection policy.

Read more
February 20, 2021
Mental Health Connect

Mind Blank is proud to work alongside the Australian & New Zealand Mental Health Association to help support The Mental Health Connect 2020 Online Expo. Click here to find out more.

Read more
February 20, 2021
Workplace Mental Health

This article features 10 insights regarding Workplace Mental Health. Find out what signs you can look out for when it comes to COVID 19.

Read more
February 20, 2021
Sustainable Development Goal 3

Mind Blank’s mission is supportive of Sustainable Development Goal 3.4 By 2030, reduce by one third premature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment and promote mental health and well-being. Find out how we complement making an impact in the community.

Read more
February 20, 2021
How to Prevent Felling Depressed

Have you been feeling a little blue lately? This article will show you 10 things you can do to support your mental health today!

Read more
Contact Us or Make a Booking
For general enquires  contact us on 0468912399
To enquire or make a direct workshop booking  click here.
To sign up to the Mind Blank Newsletter click here.
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
© Copyright 2018 Mind Blank. ABN 18 168 485 176. All Rights Reserved.
Mind Blank acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land on which we work.  
We pay our respects to Elders past and present, and extend our respect to all Elders and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across Australia.